ABDD06 International Conference, Alba Iulia, Romania, 26th-28th of September 2013

Dying and Death in 18th-21st Century Europe, sixth edition, “Eastern and Western Ways of Dying and Death” (ABDD06)

Programme

Wednesday 25th of September 2013

15:00-19:00 Delegation Registration Hotel Parc

19:00 -20.30 Welcome Dinner

Location “1 Decembrie 1918” University of Alba Iulia Restaurant

Thursday 26th of September 2013

8:30-13:00 Delegation Registration Open Hotel Parc

9:30 -10.10 Opening Address

Location A9 Hall, “1 Decembrie 1918” Univeristy of  Alba Iulia

Speakers:

Ion Dumitrel, President of Alba Iulia County, Romania

Daniel Breaz, Rector of “1 Decembrie 1918” University of Alba Iulia, Romania

Gabriel Rustoiu, Director of National Museum of Unification, Alba Iulia, Romania

Hilary J. Grainger, London College of Fashion, University of London, UK

Revd Dr. Peter C. Jupp, Department of Divinity, Edinburgh University, UK

Tony Walter, University of Bath, UK

Ruth McManus University of Canterbury, New Zealand

Dejan Donev, University “Sts. Cyril and Metodie”, Republic of Macedonia

Tudor Rosu National Museum of Unification, Alba Iulia

Marius Rotar “1 Decembrie 1918” University of Alba Iulia

10.10-10.25 Coffee Break

10.25-13.00   Session

The Carnivalized Death in Europe chair Ileana Benga, Bogdan Neagota

Birou Senat Room,  Apor Palace, “1 Decembrie 1918” University of Alba Iulia

Tijana Radeska (Macedonia), Funeral customs in the ethnographic region of Bregalnica

Sonia Maura Barillari (Italy), Le motif du corps démembré (et mangé) dans la lyrique européenne de Sordel à Le testament du capitaine

Corina Bejinariu (Romania): Wake games – the collective spending of death by ritual “joyfulness” Narcisa Știucă (Romania), Function and Significance of Death in Carnivalesque Manifestations

Ileana Benga (Romania), The comedy of the Death and the Ressurection in the Romanian Căluș [paper and film]

10.30-13.00

Literature/Philosophy/Film chair Adriana Teodorescu (Romania)

Stefan Apor Room, Apor Palace, “1 Decembrie 1918” University of Alba Iulia

Olga Grădinaru (Romania), Death Representation in the Soviet Novel and Cinema of the World War II. A. Fadeyev’s The Young Guard

Piero Pasini (Italy), The last drama by Giacinto Gallina

Alina Andreica (Romania), Les rites de protections dans l’imaginaire littéraire transylvain (la veillée funèbre chrétienne/la veillée funèbre payenne)

Irena Ragaisiene (Lithuania), “Graveyard and Grieving in Ann Patchett’s The Magician’s Assistant”

Gabriel Barbulet (Romania), Implicatures and pragmatic context in funeral texts

13:00-14:45 Lunch Pub 13 Restaurant

14:45-17:15

The Carnivalized Death in Europe chair Ileana Benga, Bogdan Neagota

Birou Senat Room,  Apor Palace, “1 Decembrie 1918” University of Alba Iulia

Cesare Poppi (Italy), Death, Masks and Carnival: ritual practice, metaphor and ‘the real thing’ in Europe

Anamaria Iuga (Romania), Nichita’s death. Carnival in Dognecea, Caraș-Severin

Bogdan Neagota (Romania), The Carnivalized Death in the Fășanc from Goruia, Caraș-Severin [paper and film]

Gabriel-Cătălin Stoian (Romania), Life and Death in Brănești (Ilfov). A case study –Ziua Cucilor/The Day of the Cuckoos [paper and film]

Alin Rus (USA), Representations of Death in the Carnival Events at the End of the Year in Moldova

14:45-17:15 Workshop chair Ruth McManus (New Zealand)

Aula Mica, “1 Decembrie 1918” University of Alba Iulia, “1 Decembrie 1918” University of Alba Iuli

Joy Berger (USA),  Music and Grief: Past, Present and Future

16.00-17.15 Euthanasia chair Peter C. Jupp (UK)

Stefan Apor Room, Apor Palace, “1 Decembrie 1918” University of Alba Iulia

Sheena M. Eagan Chamberlin (USA), Euthanasia on the Battlefield: the dilemma of constrained choice

Mihai Roman (Romania), Judeo-Christian funeral rites – their relevance for contemporaneity (moved from Rituals/Specificity section)

17.15-17.30 Coffee Break

17:30-20.00 The Carnivalized Death in Europe chair Ileana Benga, Bogdan Neagota

Birou Senat Room,  Apor Palace, “1 Decembrie 1918” University of Alba Iulia

Giovanni Kezich, Michele Trentini (Italy), Carnival King of Europe [film, 30 min.]

Mihai Andrei Leaha (Romania), Shooting the Goat. An Ethnographic Documentary about New Year Carnival in Romos, Hunedoara [film, 30 min.]

Filippo Marranci, Marco Magistrali (Italy), The Funeral of Cecco [film, 30 min.]

Vasile Mathe (Romania): Carnival Wedding and Funeral in Dognecea, Caraș-Severin [film, 30 min.]

Adela Ambrușan (Romania), The Ripu’s Funeral. A Carnival from Caraș-Severin, Romania [film, 30 min.]

17:30-20.00

Rituals/Specificity chair Hilary Grainger (UK)

Stefan Apor Room, Apor Palace, “1 Decembrie 1918” University of Alba Iulia

Nana Chabukiani (Georgia), Disrupted Continuity and Commemoration of the Deceased: Case of IDPs in Georgia

Federica Viello (Italy), The mourning and Nigerian migrants in Turin

Andréia Martins, Pedro Guimarães (Brazil), Diablo trilogy: characters and players between life and death

Federica Manfredi (Switzerland), Performing Death in Civitavecchia. A Contemporary Blood Rite during the Good Friday Procession

Paul Voninski (USA), Death Rituals in the Cloud: Change and meaning in the intersection of information technology and traditional social behavior

History chair Piero Pasini (Italy)

Aula Mica, “1 Decembrie 1918” University of Alba Iulia, “1 Decembrie 1918” University of Alba Iulia

Helen Frisby (UK), Portending death in nineteenth and early twentieth century Britain

Christoph De Spiegeleer (Belgium), Royal deathbeds in Belgium (1850-1910): experiences and representations

Naum Trajanovski (Macedonia), Western travellers in the southern balkans:  death rituals in the “ottoman period”

20:30-1:00

Dinner Preciosa Restaurant

Karaoke Party (optional)

Friday 27th of September 2013

9.45-13.00

New Ritualizations of Death in 21st Century chair Helen Frisby (UK)

Stefan Apor Room, Apor Palace, “1 Decembrie 1918” University of Alba Iulia

Tony Walter (UK), Why the Twenty First Century Dead Become Angels?

Calin Goina (Romania), Weeping death without weeping

Leonie Kellaher(UK), Where are the Dead?

Coffe Break (11.15-11.30)

Andréia Martins (Brazil), Main reasons to watch the wake of someone I have never known – Points of view of the “Dead People Profiles” community Users

Daniela Maci (Romania), Secularization of Death in Romania: Reality or Not?

Cremation chair Ken Worpole (UK)

Birou Senat Room,  Apor Palace, “1 Decembrie 1918” University of Alba Iulia

Peter C. Jupp (UK), The forty year achievement: Scotland’s Cremation Society and Maryhill Crematorium

Marius Rotar (Romania), Crossing the Lines: Calinic I. Popp Serboianu and the Issues of Cremation in Interwar Romania

Hilary J. Grainger (UK), James Chalmers ‘A Scheme of Cremation for Scotland’: Glasgow Maryhill

Coffe Break (11.15-11.30)

Aleksandra Pavićević (Serbia), Why was the Writer cremated? Thanatological aspects of death and funeral of Yugoslav literate Ivo Andrić

Ana Soviany (Romania), The death of Sergiu Nicolaescu: searching for the scapegoat

13:00-14:00

Lunch “1 Decembrie 1918” University of Alba Iulia

14.15-18:30 Turda Salt Mine http://salinaturda.eu/?lang=en

19:00-20.30 Dinner 1 Decembrie 1918 University of Alba Iulia

Saturday 28th September 2013

9.00-11

Corpses/Cemeteries/Funeral Homes chair Horea Poenar (Romania)

Stefan Apor Room, Apor Palace, “1 Decembrie 1918” University of Alba Iulia

Ken Worpole (UK), Modernism comes to terms with Death: the Igualada Cemetery of Enric Miralles in Spain

Alexandra Argeșanu (Romania), Cemeteries ensemble vegetation: symbolism and expression

Lakhbir K. Jassal (UK), Governing perilous corpses, bodies and remains: the production of ritual expertise in Brighton and Liverpool

Luigi Bartolomei, Alberto Bortolotti (Italy), Tanato space in Italy. Which inspiration or model for new funeral homes?

Reproduction/Birth/Death/Afterlife chair Tony Walter (UK)

Birou Senat Room,  Apor Palace, “1 Decembrie 1918” University of Alba Iulia

Rasa Račiūnaitė-Paužuolienė (Lithuania), Conceptualization of Death and the Afterlife in the 21st Century: A case study in Lithuania

Catalina Hutanu (Romania), When does Death Begin?

Adriana Teodorescu, Roxana Varian (Romania), Romanian Contemporary Perceptions of Death and Afterlife. A Case Study

Dejan Mickovik, Katerina Kochkovska (Macedonia), The Concept of Reproductive Freedom and the Posthumous Reproduction in the Republic of Macedonia

Coffe Break (11.00-11.10

11.10-13.40

Loss/Bereaveament/Palliative Cares chair Paul Voninski (USA)

Birou Senat Room,  Apor Palace, “1 Decembrie 1918” University of Alba Iulia

Ruth McManus (New Zealand), Women’s Voices Finding Solace: emotional narratives of coping with mass destruction and loss

Cristina Speranza, Medina Bordea (Romania), Palliative Care: Between Common Sense and Counseling

Dejan Donev (Macedonia), Palliative care and end of life in the postmodern society

Denizia Gal (Romania), Interdisciplinary in assisting palliative end of life

Marina Sozzi (Italy), Euthanasia in the western world: discussions, debate, legislations, relationship to the palliative cares (moved from Euthanasia Section)

Literature/History chair Aleksandra Pavicevic (Serbia)

Birou Senat Room,  Apor Palace, “1 Decembrie 1918” University of Alba Iulia

Noémi Farkas (Hungary), „Et moriemur”. The place of the observer and observed through the representation of the funeral oratio in the 18-19 Century Transylvanian Aristocracy

Aura Poenar (Romania), Death as Symptom in Wagner’s Parsifal

Horea Poenar (Romania), You Have Seen Nothing Yet. Vision, Time and Death in Sorin Titel’s Novel

Laura Coltofean (Romania), Death as a Political Instrument. Introducing the “Bolshevik” and “Hungarian Death” as Death of Otherness

Claudiu Stefani, Rodica Stanea (Romania) Taming the death, funeral ceremonies in rural areas in Romania

Workshop chair Leonie Kellaher (UK)

IT Room, Apor Palace, “1 Decembrie 1918” University of Alba Iulia

Janice Nadeau (USA), Meaning-Making in the Family Bereavement

13.45-13.55 Conclusions

Chair Tudor Rosu

Birou Senat Room,  Apor Palace, “1 Decembrie 1918” University of Alba Iulia

14:30-16.00 Lunch Steak House Restaurant

16:00-19:00 Free Time

19.00-20:30 Dinner Steak House Restaurant

Workshop Title: “Music and Grief: Past, Present and Future”

Presenter: Joy S. Berger, FT, DMA, BCC, MT-BC  (USA) is the Director of Education for Hospice Education Network, Inc., www.hospiceonline.com; author/conference presenter for Music of the Soul – Composing Life Out of Loss, published by Routledge in Series in Death, Dying and Bereavement; and webmaster for www.composinglife.com.

Brief Abstract
Through all civilizations and all of life’s developmental stages, music can be found that has been composed and used to express grief. Both i
intrapersonally and interpersonally, music can be an intimate mode for being in and moving through one’s mourning. “Music and Grief: Past, Present and Future” engages participants to explore uses of music with the dying and bereaved from past historical perspectives, present-day research theories and clinical applications, and future envisioning for global networking and grief support through utilizing new technologies.

Longer Abstract
Through all civilizations and all of life’s developmental stages, music can be found that has been composed and used to express grief. Both intrapersonally and interpersonally, music can be an intimate mode for being in and moving through one’s mourning. “Music and Grief: Past, Present and Future” engages participants to explore uses of music with the dying and bereaved from past historical perspectives, present-day research theories and clinical applications, and future envisioning for global networking and grief support through utilizing new technologies. First, this workshop lays a foundation for participants with historical examples of music primarily from 18th-21st century Europe and the life-music experiences of this workshop’s participants. Cross-cultural similarities and differences easily emerge.

Second, contemporary grief/loss theories and music therapy practices with the dying and bereaved are presented. Dr. Berger’s “Seasons of the Soul” paradigm provides empowering, sensitive music interventions for guiding grieving persons in memorializing, mourning, reconstructing meanings, and moving into life anew. Principles, interventions, and resources are targeted to the participant’s professional scope of practice, musical background, and grief/loss context.  This conference’s international participants are engaged to reflect and on and hear each others’ cross-cultural experiences of using music at times of dying and mourning.Third, future uses of music with the dying and bereaved will be envisioned and encouraged for participants, drawing from their own personal and professional contexts and roles. Examples will include today’s technologies for composing music and sharing it with others through social/global networking. Collective expertise from participants will be ignited and invited, thus moving music and grief with the dying and bereaved into the future.

Learning Objectives: At the end of this session, participants will be able to  …

1. Describe historical examples of music with the dying and bereaved.

2. Identify and discuss simple music interventions with the dying and bereaved to use within one’s own culture, context, and professional role.

3. Contribute to a collective discussion on future uses of music with the dying and bereaved, drawing from today’s technologies and global/social networking.

Joy Berger, FT, DMA, BCC, MT-BC, is a life-long, professional musician with vast interdisciplinary hospice leadership as a hospice psychosocial/spiritual counselor, music therapist, educator, and administrator. She is the Director of Education for the Hospice Education Network, www.hospiceonline.com, providing online education for hospice and palliative care professionals throughout the USA. Her first career was as classical pianist, with her doctorate in double fields of piano performance and psychology of religion, with research in music and grief. Dr. Berger was awarded the National Heart of Hospice Psychosocial/Spiritual Caregiver (2002) by the National Hospice and Palliative Care Organization. She is the author of Music of the Soul: Composing Life Out of Loss, published in Routledge’s Series in Death, Dying, and Bereavement, and is webmaster for www.composinglife.com.

Contact
Dr. Joy Berger
5816 Waveland Circle
Prospect, KY 40059 USA
jberger288@aol.com
Phone: 011-502-593-3916
www.composinglife.com
www.hospiceonline.com

WORKSHOP TITLE: MEANING-MAKING IN BEREAVED FAMILIES

Janice Nadeau, Ph.D.

Work shop Objectives

Appreciate the added benefit of viewing grief through a family lens.

Explain what Family Systems Theory adds to our understanding of family grief.

Describe how Symbolic Interaction Theory contributes to understanding grief.

Discuss the hypothesized relationship between family meanings and the course of bereavement.

Identify three strategies that families use to make sense of a death in the family.

Identify three examples of meanings that families commonly attach to the loss of a family member.

Compare family grief therapy with individual grief therapy.

Identify family therapy methods that are useful in working with bereaved families from a meaning-making perspective.

Workshop Description

We understand grief mostly in terms of how individuals grieve. When grief is seen as a family process we understand grief differently. We see family variables and family processes that are different from those seen in individuals.  In this workshop we will focus on the strategies that families use to make sense of a death and on the meanings that families construct. This interactive process is known as “family meaning-making.” Some of the meaning-making strategies that will be examined are telling the story of the death, characterizing the deceased, comparing the current death to other deaths and making something of so called coincidences, a strategy that I have referred to as “coincidancing.”  Family meanings may be positive or negative and are not synonymous with Frankl’s finding meaning and purpose in life. We hypothesize that the meanings that families make have a significant effect on the course of bereavement and are therefore worthy of our attention. For example, if a family construes the death of a family member as preventable but the death was not prevented, their grief is likely to be more problematic than grief following a death that was expected and may even have been a relief.

In this workshop Dr. Nadeau will be using examples from her own research on bereaved families and from her 30 years of experience as a hospice nurse, family researcher, author and her clinical practice as a psychologist and marriage and family therapist. The format of the workshop will be a combination of lecture and discussion punctuated by poetry and attempts at humor.

Janice Nadeau, Ph.D.

Biographical data

Dr. Janice Winchester Nadeau is a Psychologist, Marriage and Family Therapist, and Master’s Prepared Nurse.  For 30 years she has been active in the death and dying field as a hospice nurse, college faculty, researcher, psychotherapist and author. Dr. Nadeau is a Fellow in Thanatology as designated by the Association of Death Education and Counseling (ADEC) based in the U.S.  In 1984 she was awarded a much coveted Bush Leadership Fellowship to complete her Ph.D. on family grief. In 1987 she received a four-year National Institute of Health grant to study the impact of loss on families. Her doctoral dissertation won the National Council on Family Relations and Sage book award which resulted in the publishing of Families Making Sense of Death in 1998. Dr. Nadeau is an invited member of the International Work Group on Death, Dying and Bereavement.  In 2000 she received the Distinguished Service to Families Award from the Minnesota Association for Marriage and Family Therapy.  In 2001 she was invited to serve on a two-year Scientific Advisory Panel on bereavement at the Center for Advancement of Health in Washington, D.C.  Dr. Nadeau is on the editorial board of the journal, Illness, Crisis and Loss, and has served several years on an advisory panel for the Child Bereavement Study at Arizona State University.  In 2005 Dr. Nadeau received the clinical practice award from the Association for Death Education and Counseling.

In 2005 Dr. Nadeau was chosen to be the “Visiting Grief Educator of the Year” by the Australian Centre for Grief and Bereavement. This honor involved teaching professional workshops in five cities in Australia and two cities in New Zealand. In recent years she has presented her work on family grief at Sydney University, The University of Kyoto, and The University of Bologna, at IWG meetings in Delphi Greece; Maastricht, The Netherlands; San Paulo, Brazil; and Hong Kong as well as multiple sites in Canada and the United States. Since 1991 she has presented her research and taught family grief at over a dozen ADEC conferences. She is currently faculty for ADEC teaching Advanced Grief Therapy. Dr. Nadeau is in private practice in Minneapolis, Minnesota as a Psychologist and Marriage and Family Therapist.

12.09.2013

Preliminary program of ABDD06:

The Carnivalized Death in Europe / La morte carnevalizzata in Europa

Session I [The Carnivalized Death in Europe]

Tijana Radeska (Macedonia), Funeral customs in the ethnographic region of Bregalnica

Sonia Maura Barillari (Italy), Le motif du corps démembré (et mangé) dans la lyrique européenne de Sordel à Le testament du capitaine [paper]

Corina Bejinariu (Romania): Wake games – the collective spending of death by ritual “joyfulness” [paper]

Narcisa Știucă (Romania), Function and Significance of Death in Carnivalesque Manifestations [paper and photos]

Ileana Benga (Romania), The comedy of the Death and the Ressurection in the Romanian Căluș [paper and film]

Gabriel-Cătălin Stoian (Romania), Life and Death in Brănești (Ilfov). A case study – Ziua Cucilor/The Day of the Cuckoos [paper and film]

Session II [The Carnivalized Death in Europe]: 15-18

Cesare Poppi (Italy), Death, Masks and Carnival: ritual practice, metaphor and ‘the real thing’ in Europe [paper and photos]

Anamaria Iuga (Romania), Nichita’s death. Carnival in Dognecea, Caraș-Severin [paper and film]

Bogdan Neagota (Romania), The Carnivalized Death in the șanc from Goruia, Caraș-Severin [paper and film]

Alin Rus (USA), Representations of Death in the Carnival Events at the End of the Year in Moldova [paper and photos]

Session III [The Carnivalized Death in Europe]: ……

Giovanni Kezich, Michele Trentini (Italy), Carnival King of Europe [film, 60 min.]

Mihai Andrei Leaha (Romania), Shooting the Goat. An Ethnographic Documentary about New Year Carnival in Romos, Hunedoara [film, 30 min.]

Filippo Marranci, Marco Magistrali (Italy), The Funeral of Cecco [film, 30 min.]

Adela Ambrușan (Romania), The Ripu’s Funeral. A Carnival from Caraș-Severin, Romania [film, 30 min.]

Euthanasia

Marina Sozzi (Italy), Euthanasia in the western world: discussions, debate, legislations, relationship to the palliative cares

Sheena M. Eagan Chamberlin (USA), Euthanasia on the Battlefield: the dilemma of constrained choice

Marco Cavina (Italy), Euthanasia in Europe between the Eighteenth and Nineteenth Century

Nikola Tupanceski,  Dragana Kiprijanovska (Macedonia), The right to die vs. The value of life – the story about euthanasia and assisted suicide

Cremation

Peter C. Jupp (UK), The forty year achievement: Scotland’s Cremation Society and Maryhill Crematorium

Aleksandra Pavićević (Serbia), Why was the Writer cremated? Thanatological aspects of death and funeral of Yugoslav literate Ivo Andrić

Hilary J. Grainger (UK), James Chalmers ‘A Scheme of Cremation for Scotland’: Glasgow Maryhill

Marius Rotar (Romania), Crossing the Lines: Calinic I. Popp Serboianu and the Issues of Cremation in Interwar Romania

Ana Soviany (Romania), The death of Sergiu Nicolaescu: searching for the scapegoat

Corpses/Cemeteries/Funeral Homes

Ken Worpole (UK), Modernism comes to terms with Death: the Igualada Cemetery of Enric Miralles in Spain

Alexandra Argeșanu (Romania), Cemeteries ensemble vegetation: symbolism and expression

Lakhbir K. Jassal (UK), Governing perilous corpses, bodies and remains: the production of ritual expertise in Brighton and Liverpool

Luigi Bartolomei, Alberto Bortolotti (Italy), Tanato space in Italy. Which inspiration or model for new funeral homes?

New Ritualizations of Death in 21st Century

Tony Walter (UK), Why the Twenty First Century Dead Become Angels?

Adela Toplean (Romania), When Life Takes Over, People Die: three thoughts on the contradictions of personal knowledge of death in contemporary times

Leonie Kellaher (UK), Where are the Dead?

Andréia Martins (Brazil), Main reasons to watch the wake of someone I have never known – Points of view of the “Dead People Profiles” community Users

Daniela Maci (Romania), Secularization of Death in Romania: Reality or Not?

Csaba Tódor (Romania), How does funeral correlates one’s fulfillment with identity?

History

Helen Frisby (UK), Portending death in nineteenth and early twentieth century Britain

Christoph De Spiegeleer (Belgium), Royal deathbeds in Belgium (1850-1910): experiences and representations

Naum Trajanovski (Macedonia), Western travellers in the southern balkans:  death rituals in the “ottoman period”

Noémi Farkas (Hungary), „Et moriemur”. The place of the observer and observed through the representation of the funeral oratio in the 18-19 Century Transylvanian Aristocracy

Laura Coltofean (Romania), Death as a Political Instrument. Introducing the “Bolshevik” and “Hungarian Death” as Death of Otherness.

Raul Cârstocea (Austria), The Nation unto Death: Performance and Participation at Funerals of the Romanian Legionary Movement

Aleksandra Kurowska-Susdorf (Poland), Children Participation in Kashubian Death Rituals and its Educational Dimension

Literature/Philosophy/Film

Olga Grădinaru (Romania), Death Representation in the Soviet Novel and Cinema of the World War II. A. Fadeyev’s The Young Guard

Piero Pasini (Italy), The last drama by Giacinto Gallina

Aura Poenar (Romania), Death as Symptom in Wagner’s Parsifal

Alina Andreica (Romania), Les rites de protections dans l’imaginaire littéraire transylvain (la veillée funèbre chrétienne/la veillée funèbre payenne)

Audrone Raskauskiene (Lithuania), Confronting Death Anxiety in Irvin Yalom’s The Schopenhauer Cure and Staring at the Sun: Overcoming the Terror of Death”

Irena Ragaisiene (Lithuania), “Graveyard and Grieving in Ann Patchett’s The Magician’s Assistant”

Horea Poenar (Romania), You Have Seen Nothing Yet. Vision, Time and Death in Sorin Titel’s Novel

Gabriel Barbulet (Romania), Implicatures and pragmatic context in funeral texts

Reproduction/Birth/Death/Afterlife

Rasa Račiūnaitė-Paužuolienė (Lithuania), Conceptualization of Death and the Afterlife in the 21st Century: A case study in Lithuania

Catalina Hutanu (Romania), When does Death Begin?

Adriana Teodorescu, Roxana Varian (Romania), Romanian Contemporary Perceptions of Death and Afterlife. A Case Study

Dejan Mickovik, Katerina Kochkovska (Macedonia), The Concept of Reproductive Freedom and the Posthumous Reproduction in the Republic of Macedonia

Loss/Bereaveament/Palliative Cares

Ruth McManus (New Zealand), Women’s Voices Finding Solace: emotional narratives of coping with mass destruction and loss

Cristina Speranza, Medina Bordea (Romania), Palliative Care: Between Common Sense and Counseling

Dejan Donev (Macedonia), Palliative care and end of life in the postmodern society

Denisa Gal (Romania), Interdisciplinarity in assisting palliative end of life

Rituals/Specificity

Nana Chabukiani (Georgia), Disrupted Continuity and Commemoration of the Deceased: Case of IDPs in Georgia

Federica Viello (Italy), The mourning and Nigerian migrants in Turin

Andréia Martins, Pedro Guimarães (Brazil), Diablo trilogy: characters and players between life and death

Mihai Roman (Romania), Judeo-Christian funeral rites – their relevance for contemporaneity

Federica Manfredi (Switzerland), Performing Death in Civitavecchia. A Contemporary Blood Rite during the Good Friday Procession

Paul Voninski (USA), Death Rituals in the Cloud: Change and meaning in the intersection of information technology and traditional social behavior

Dragos Carciga (Romania), The Death That We Need: the Ineluctable of Morbidity in the Phenomenology of the Mob

Workshops (3 hours) Grief/Bereavement

Joy Berger (USA), Music and Grief  – workshop 3 hours

Janice Nadeau (USA), Meaning-Making in the Family Bereavement – workshop 3 hours

61 papers, 2 workshops, 15 countries, 80 participants + Karaoke + visit Old Salt Mine

Time for presentation: 23 minutes

Time for questions, answers, comments: 5-7 minutes

4.07.2013

First draft of the accepted abstract proposals/presentations:

Aleksandra Pavićević (Serbia), Why was the Writer cremated? Thanatological aspects of death and funeral of Yugoslav literate Ivo Andrić

Nana Chabukiani (Goergia), Disrupted Continuity and Commemoration of the Deceased: Case of IDPs in Georgia

Leonie Kellaher (UK),  Where are the Dead?

Helen Frisby (UK), Portending death in nineteenth and early twentieth century Britain

Anna E. Kubiak (Poland), Funerals and funeral industry in Poland.

Marina Sozzi (Italy), Euthanasia in the western world: discussions, debate, legislations, relationship to the palliative cares.

Ruth McManus (New Zealand),  Women’s Voices Finding Solace: emotional narratives of coping with mass destruction and loss.

Sheena M. Eagan Chamberlin (USA), Euthanasia on the Battlefield: the dilemma of constrained choice

Marco Cavina (Italy), Euthanasia in Europe between the Eighteenth and Nineteenth Century

Christoph De Spiegeleer (Belgium), Royal deathbeds in Belgium (1850-1910): experiences and representations.

Tony Walter (UK), Why the Twenty First Century Dead Become Angels?

Ken Worpole (UK), Modernism comes to terms with Death: the Igualada Cemetery of Enric Miralles in Spain

Joy Berger (USA), Music and Grief –workshop 3 hours

Janice Nadeau (USA), Meaning-Making in the Family Bereavement workshop 3 hours

Dragos Carciga (Romania), The Death That We Need: the Ineluctable of Morbidity in the Phenomenology of the Mob

Olga Grădinaru (Romania), Death Representation in the Soviet Novel and Cinema of the World War II. A. Fadeyev’s The Young Guard

Aura Poenar (Romania), Death as Symptom in Wagner’s Parsifal

Adriana Teodorescu, Roxana Varian (Romania), Romanian Contemporary Perceptions of Death and Afterlife.  A Case Study

Adriana Teodorescu (Romania), Death has No Meaning. Sartre and his Inconvenient Anthropology of Death

Alina Andreica (Romania), Les rites de protections dans l’imaginaire littéraire transylvain (la veillée funèbre chrétienne/la veillée funèbre payenne)

Adela Toplean (Romania), When Life Takes Over, People Die: three thoughts on the contradictions of personal knowledge of death in contemporary times

Naum Trajanovski (Macedonia), Western travellers in the southern balkans:  death rituals in the “ottoman period”

Caciuloiu Alexandru, Caciuloiu Livia (Romania), Bereaved Romanians. Experential and unifing group-therapy approaches

Dejan Donev (Macedonia), palliative care and end of life in the postmodern society

Audrone Raskauskiene (Lithunia), Confronting Death Anxiety in Irvin Yalom’s The Schopenhauer Cure and Staring at the Sun: Overcoming the Terror of Death

Luigi Bartolomei, Alberto Bortolotti (Italy), TANATO_SPACE in Italy. Which inspiration or model for new funeralhomes?

Irena Ragaisiene (Lithuania), “Graveyard and Grieving in Ann Patchett’s The Magician’s Assistant”.

Nikola Tupanceski,  Dragana Kiprijanovska (Macedonia), THE RIGHT TO DIE VS. THE VALUE OF LIFE –   THE STORY ABOUT EUTHANASIA AND ASSISTED SUICIDE

Noémi Farkas (Hungary): „Et moriemur”. The place of the observer and observed through the representation of the funeral oratio in the 18-19. Century Transylvanian Aristocracy

Federica Viello (Italy), The mourning and Nigerian migrants in Turin”

Andréia Martins (Brazil) Main reasons to watch the wake of someone I have never known – Points of view of the “Dead People Profiles” community Users

Andréia Martins, Pedro Guimarães (Brazil) Diablo trilogy: characters and players between life and death

Piero Pasini (Italy)  The last drama by Giacinto Gallina

Ana Soviany (Romania) ,  The death of Sergiu Nicolaescu: searching for the scapegoat

Daniela Maci (Romania), Secularisation of Death in Romania: Reality or Not?

Federica Manfredi (Switzerland), Performing Death in Civitavecchia. A Contemporary Blood Rite during the Good Friday Procession.

Alexandra Argeșanu (Romania),  Cemeterial ensemble vegetation: symbolism and expression

Paul Voninski (USA), Death Rituals in the Cloud: Change and meaning in the intersection of information technology and traditional social behavior

Raul Cârstocea (Austria), The Nation unto Death: Performance and Participation at Funerals of the Romanian Legionary Movement

Cristina Speranza, Medina Bordea (Romania), Palliative Care: Between Common Sense and Counseling

Dejan Mickovik, Katerina Kochkovska (Macedonia), The Concept of Reproductive Freedom and the Posthumous Reproduction in the Republic of Macedonia

Hilary J. Grainger (UK), James Chalmers ‘A Scheme of Cremation for Scotland’: Glasgow Maryhill

Lakhbir K. Jassal (UK), Governing perilous corpses, bodies and remains: the production of ritual expertise in Brighton and Liverpool

Laura Coltofean (Romania), Death as a Political Instrument. Introducing the “Bolshevik” and “Hungarian Death” as Death of Otherness.

Rasa Račiūnaitė-Paužuolienė (Lithuania), Conceptualization of Death and the Afterlife in the 21st Century: A case study in Lithuania

Mairi Harper (UK), Mothers continuing bonds and ambivalence to personal mortality after the death of their child – An interpretative phenomenological analysis

Catalina Hutanu (Romania), When does Death Begin?

Marius Rotar (Romania), Crossing the Lines: CalinIc I. Popp Serboianu and the Issues of Cremation in Romania

PS. We extend the deadline for receiving abstract proposals for our conference until 20th of July 2013.

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